Steven Butler's Family History Website

BIOGRAPHIES INDEX

Biographies

The Richardson Family

By Steven R. Butler, Ph.D.

Introduction
Jonathan Richardson | William Richardson | Amos Richardson | Isaac E. Richardson | Ady (or Ada) Ann Richardson

Introduction

The Richardson family is one of five interrelated families from whom I am descended, which resided in Hardin County, Kentucky during the late eighteenth century and most of the nineteenth century. (The others are the Gilliland, Haycraft, Morrison, and Van Meter families.) I am related to the Richardson family by virtue of the marriage of my maternal great-grandfather William Newton Jenkins to Emmerine Morrison, who was the daughter of Ada Ann (Richardson) Morrison, who was the daughter of Isaac E. Richardson.

During the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, several individuals bearing the Richardson surname immigrated from England, Scotland, and Ireland to North America, where according to various sources, they initially settled in Maryland and Virginia. Unfortunately, not only have the "Old World" origins of my particular branch of the Richardson family been lost to history but also there is some uncertainty surrounding our "New World" origins.

There is no uncertainty however, regarding at least two generations of this family, pioneer settlers of Hardin County, Kentucky, who made this corner of the Blue Grass state their home for nearly a century. Hardin County deed, marriage, and will records, combined with federal census records and tombstone inscriptions, have enabled me to tell the story, albeit an incomplete one, of a family of eighteenth and nineteenth century farmers who owing in some cases to illiteracy and in all cases to the time-consuming demands of their agrarian lifestyle, were either unable or ill-equipped to tell it themselves.


Jonathan Richardson? (1715 or 1721-1773)1

Although some other family history researchers are convinced that a man named Jonathan Richardson is our earliest known ancestor in this line, I am doubtful, owing largely to errors, omissions, and conflicting information in some of the accounts I have seen on the Internet and elsewhere.

From the very beginning, there are problems. One researcher states that Jonathan Richardson was born in Prince William County, Virginia in 1715 whereas another states he was born Maryland in 1721. Most researchers agree that he was married to a woman named Elizabeth (some state that her maiden name was Taylor), in Loudoun County, Virginia in 1741. However, this is where we encounter our second problem: Loudoun County, Virginia was not formed until 1757 (from the western portion of Fairfax County).

With his first wife, Jonathan is said to have had the following named children: Joseph, born 1744 in Loudoun County, Virginia; William, likewise born in 1744 in Loudoun County; and Mary, born in 1755 (place not noted). Unfortunately, none of these names and birth dates appears to be supported by evidence and as previously remarked above, Loudon County did not exist until 1757.

Joseph Richardson is supposed to have married a woman named Sarah Compton on 12 January 1769 and William is said to have married Susannah English; places not stated. No evidence is cited to support this information either.

In 1755, Elizabeth Richardson is supposed to have died in Loudoun County (two years before the county actually existed). Jonathan reportedly took a second wife named Ann Massey on 07 October 1759 in St. John's, Baltimore County, Maryland. Together, he and Ann are said to have had the following named children: Jesse, born 1760 in Loudoun County; Thomas, born 1761 in Loudoun County; Amos, born 18 September 1764 in Loudoun County; Nancy, date and place of birth not stated; and Aimey, likewise.

Jesse Richardson is supposed to have married Martha English in 1780 in Lincoln County, Kentucky. Thomas reportedly married Elizabeth Crouch in 1781 (place not stated) and Amos is supposed to have married Susannah Smith in 1790.

On 05 October 1722 Jonathan Richardson signed his will, an abstract of which is included in Joida Whitten's Abstract of Bedford County, Va. Wills and Inventories and Accounts 1754-1787), pp. 183-4. Although I have never seen a photocopy of the actual will, I nonetheless accept that the document is genuine (despite the fact that one researcher states the will was proven on 24 May 1773 and another gives the same date and month but a different year, namely 1774). In this will, Jonathan named his heirs as follows: Jesse (to whom he gave 200 acres of land); Thomas (to whom he gave 100 acres of land); Amos (also 100 acres of land); Joseph, whom he identifies as "my son that I had by my first wife" (30 shillings); and also Mary, Nancy, and Aimey.2 He does not name a William however, which is the principal reason why although I accept that the will is authentic, I am doubtful as to whether or not he had a son named William, which most other researchers seem to accept.

Several years ago, when I questioned another researcher about this omission, I was told that there exists a 1756 indenture between Jonathan Richardson of Fairfax County, Virginia and John Taylor (Jonathan's brother-in-law or father-in-law?) of Richmond County, Virginia, which names William Richardson as Jonathan's son. Despite the fact that I have never seen either a photocopy or a transcription of this document, I accept that it is probably real. Unfortunately, there is no certainty that it concerns the same Jonathan Richardson who died in Bedford County, Virginia in 1773.

Finally, there is a problem in that there was apparently more than one Jonathan Richardson residing in the same part of Virginia in the eighteenth century, which makes it difficult to these individuals apart and also hard to determine which one, if any, was our ancestor. Until I see more conclusive evidence, I will continue to reserve judgement as to whether or not Jonathan Richardson is our earliest known ancestor in America.


William Richardson (Abt. 1744-Abt. 1819)

Although I feel relatively confident that William Richardson is our earliest known Richardson ancestor in America (for now), some of the "facts" presented by other researchers in regard to his origins are unfortunately contradictory, inconclusive, or unsupported by evidence. According to one undocumented source, he was born about 1744 in Maryland while another researcher states that he came from Virginia. To me, this lack of consensus is troublesome.3

According to yet another unconfirmed source, about 1769, when William was about twenty-five years of age, he was married to Susannah English, the fifteen-year-old daughter of Charles English, who was a pioneer settler of Garrard County, Kentucky. It is further reported that William and Susannah Richardson had eight children, as follows: Ann, born 1770; Ruth, born 1771; Louisa; born 1773 Amos, born 1775; Susannah, born 1777; William Jr., born 1779; James, born 1781; and Israel, born 1791 (probably in Lincoln County, Kentucky). Another source reports, without offering any evidence for it, that after William's first wife died, he married another woman whose first name was also Susannah (possibly Stewart).

There is no doubt, however, that in 1783 an individual named William Richardson received a grant from the State of Virginia for 300 acres in Lincoln County, Kentucky, where marriage records confirm that on 04 August 1788, a woman named Ann Richardson married a David Lawson4 and on 21 April 1798, an Amos Richardson married a Sally Morrison,5 reportedly the daughter of a neighbor, David Morrison (who is also one of our ancestors; see Morrison family). Although these marriages lend some weight to the supposition that the William Richardson named in the land grant is "ours," they do not constitute proof positive.

Lincoln County, Kentucky marriage records also include a Jonathan Richardson, who married a Jane Morrisson on 19 December 1796.6 The relationship (if any) of either bride or groom to our Richardson and Morrison lines is presently uncertain but it is possible that Jane Morrison (not Morrisson) was also a daughter of David Morrison. It is less certain however, whether the Jonathan Richardson who married her was a member of the family treated here.

Although we can be certain that a man named William Richardson received a land grant in Lincoln County, Kentucky in 1783, there seems to be no evidence that he actually went to live on it. No individual named William Richardson in the correct age group of "our" William (who would have been fifty-six in 1800 and sixty-six in 1810) is listed in any of the early nineteenth century federal census records for Kentucky. There are likewise no deed records on file for "our" William Richardson in Hardin County, Kentucky, where his will is supposed to have been written on 20 November 1819 and proved in court in May 1825.7

It is equally unfortunate that the original copy of the will was reportedly lost or stolen sometime since 1943, when the researcher from whom I received this information-Mae Mead-visited the Hardin County courthouse in Elizabethtown and made a hand-written transcription. According to Mrs. Mead, William Richardson identified Susannah as his second wife and stated that he wished his property to be divided among his youngest children by her, namely John and Thomas Richardson. The will also names his oldest children: Ann (married name Lawson); Louisa (married name Lawson); Amos Richardson; Ruth (married name Hicks); Bill Richardson (William Junior, obviously); Israel Richardson; and Susannah (married name Hicks). Bill or Billy (i.e. William Junior) Richardson was named as executor.8

Although William Richardson's own presence in Hardin County cannot be documented to a certainty, a variety of both federal and local records attest to the residence of nearly all the individuals named in his will.


Amos Richardson's signature
(Abt. 1775-1840)

Amos Richardson, who was reportedly born in 1775, is believed to be the oldest son of William Richardson and his first wife Susannah English Richardson. If the year of his birth is correctly stated, he was also the last member of his family to be born a British subject.

On 21 April 1798, in Lincoln County, Kentucky, Amos Richardson married Sally Morrison,9 said to be the daughter of another of our ancestors, David Morrison. Together, this couple had ten children, as follows10: (Note: All marriages occurred in Hardin County, Kentucky):

  • Elizabeth Richardson, born 10 February 1799, reportedly married Bennett Franklin on 04 November 1822 although no record of marriage is on file (however, Elizabeth is named as Franklin's wife in census records and his will).11
  • Jesse M. Richardson, born 1800, married Margaret Smith on 25 July 1822.12
  • William J. or L. Richardson, born about 1801, married Anna Wilson on 04 November 1822.13
  • Daniel Lampton Richardson, born 10 February 1804, married Katherine Duncan on 05 August 1831.14
  • Isaac E. Richardson (our ancestor), born about 1807, married 1.) Letitia Gilliland on 10 October 1826,15 2.) Susan Coffman on 10 January 1823,16 and 3.) Mary Letitia Miller on 18 November 1873.17
  • Mary or Polly Richardson, born about 1810, married Samuel Lawson in September 1824.18
  • Israel M. Richardson, born about 1812, married Amanda Duncan on 31 March 1833.19
  • Nancy Richardson, born 1814, married William Russell on 22 November 1831.20
  • Eliza Richardson, born about 1816, married Harrison Dougherty on 09 December 1833.21
  • Sarah, a.k.a. "Sally" Richardson, born about 1817, married James Popham on 07 June 1838.22

In the 1800 reconstructed federal census for Kentucky, Amos Richardson is listed in Nelson County, Kentucky.23 A few years later he moved to Hardin County, where his name is found in all the federal census enumerations from 1820 through 1840.

Pioneer Log Cabin

Interestingly, when the federal census for Hardin County, Kentucky was taken in 1810 the enumerator found two men named Amos Richardson residing in Elizabethtown, the county seat.24 Curiously, neither one had a family that matches "our" Amos, which, in addition to Amos and his wife, should have consisted in 1810 of four males under 10, one female under 10, and one female from 10 to 15 years of age. Yet one of the men listed has only two daughters and the other has only one son. Clearly, neither one is "our" Amos (unless the census taker made a mistake), which begs the question: Who are these fellows? Unfortunately, I do not know and to make matters even more confusing, there were no other men named Amos Richardsons living anywhere else in Kentucky in the year 1810.

Thanks to the Hardin County deed records, we do know however that "our" Amos Richardson was there by 1811. There are also several deeds on file in the county records concerning his brother Israel.

One of the earliest of these deeds, dated 06 September 1811, records the sale of 250 acres of land adjacent to David Morrison's property by Jacob Van Meter and his wife Rebecca to Amos Richardson in consideration of the sum of $250 (i.e. $1 per acre).25

During the War of 1812, two men named Amos Richardson served in two different Kentucky volunteer regiments, one of which was led by General (and future President) William Henry Harrison and took part in the 1813 Battle of the Thames in Canada, at which the Indian leader Tecumseh was killed.26 Whether or not "our" Amos Richardson was one of those men is presently uncertain.

On 12 September 1817 Amos Richardson sold ninety-two acres of his land to Jesse Morrison, also for $1 per acre.27

On 19 October 1818, following the premature death of his first wife, Sally, Amos Richardson married thirty-one-year-old Francis, a.k.a. Fanny, Jones (born about 1787).28 Together they had two daughters: Susan (married Lenix Lawson), born 1820, died 01 April 1880 (buried in the Lawson Cemetery, Hardin County, Kentucky) and Ruth or "Ruthy,"29 for whom no marriage record can be found in Hardin County. (Note: Another researcher states, without providing any evidence, that Amos and Frances had two additional daughters: Cynthia, 1819-1849; and Sarah, 1827-1842. If this information is true, these girls apparently left no record of their brief existence.)

The 1820 federal census for Hardin County shows Amos Richardson, in addition to his family, with one slave, a woman over forty-five years of age. Curiously, Amos' oldest daughter, Elizabeth, who was not yet married, is missing from this enumeration.30

On 09 November 1820, Amos Richardson and his wife Frances sold Isaac Van Meter twenty acres of their land for $40.31

On 06 February 1821 the heirs of David Morrison (another one of our ancestors), namely his widow Mary and children James, Jesse, Isaac, Joel, Frances, Polly (and her husband James Gilliland, who is also one of our ancestors), Elizabeth (and her husband James Dougherty), and William, sold Amos Richardson 109˝ acres of land for only $1,32 which leads me to think this sale might have been the settlement of a debt, although there is no mention of any such thing in the deed. In a similar deed involving the transference of land to Joel A. Morrison in 1821, Amos Richardson is himself listed as an heir of David Morrison,33 which lends weight to the proposition that his first wife, Sally, was David Morrison's daughter (thus making David Morrison his father-in-law).

The 1830 federal census for Hardin County, Kentucky shows that Amos still owned one slave (judging by the age given, she was almost certainly the same woman he owned in 1820) and that some of his children had left home by this time.34

On 12 January 1832, Amos and Frances Richardson sold twenty-four acres of their land to Amos' son Daniel for $30.35

On 09 August 1838 Amos Richardson made out his last will and testament, leaving all his property to his wife Frances, provided she remained unmarried. In the event she remarried however, Amos directed his executors (son Daniel L. Richardson and son-in-law Bennett Franklin) to sell his property and divide the proceeds between his children, named in the document as: Elizabeth Franklin; William J. Richardson; Jesse Richardson; Daniel L. Richardson; Isaac S. [should be "E"] Richardson; Polly Lawson; Israel M. Richardson; Nancy Russell; Eliza Daugherty [should be Dougherty]; Sally Popham; and "my youngest daughters that are now with me, Susan Richardson and Ruthy Richardson." Amos directed that his half-brother Thomas Richardson "who now lives with me…should take the young filly [horse] as his own property that he now claims and get another home-beleaving [sic] that the filly would be a full Compensation for the services rendered to me by him."36

Owing obviously to the date on his will, some researchers mistakenly record 1838 as the year that Amos Richardson died. He is listed, however, in the 1840 census for Hardin County, Kentucky,37 which was conducted during the summer months, beginning on 01 June 1840. Furthermore, his will was not proved in court until 19 October 1840.38 Consequently, I think it a near certainty that he passed away sometime in late summer or early fall of 1840. Although his place of burial is presently unknown, I suspect that he was laid to rest in the Franklin Crossroads Cemetery-where so many of his first wife's relatives are buried. He was about sixty-five years of age.

On 22 December 1840, shortly after her father's death and only three days before the Christmas holiday, Susan Richardson married Lenix Lawson with the consent of her widowed mother Frances,39 who apparently never remarried. She is listed in the 1850 federal census for Hardin County. Only her daughter Ruth, for whom no marriage record can be found in the county records, is still shown as living at home.40 Frances Richardson is not listed in the 1860 federal census for Hardin County, Kentucky. One researcher states she died in Clay County, Missouri in 1867 but provides no supporting evidence.


Isaac E. Richardson's signature
(Abt. 1807-Aft. 1880)

Isaac E. Richardson was one of six sons of Amos Richardson and his first wife, Sally Morrison. He was born about 1807 in Hardin County, Kentucky, where it appears he spent his entire adult life farming near the rural community of Blue Ball, where he was almost certainly a member of the Blue Ball Baptist Church.

On 10 October 1826, nineteen-year-old Isaac E. Richardson married Letitia Gilliland, the seventeen-year-old daughter of James Gilliland (also one of our ancestors) in Hardin County, Kentucky.41 Together, they had the following named children42:

  • William, born about 1827 (multiple marriage records found in Hardin County, Kentucky; not sure which William is son of Isaac E. Richardson).
  • Thomas J., born about 1829, married Adeline Woodring 05 February 1852.43
  • Robert E., born about 1833, married Elizabeth Adkins 24 August 1855.44
  • Stephen, born about 1841, married Lou Wilmoth 01 December 1872.45
  • Greenberry (or Greenbury) H., born about 1843, married Malvina Wilmoth 16 May 1865.46
  • Emerine, born about 1845, married Joseph R. Larue 10 January 1860.47
  • Ady (or Ada) Ann (my ancestor), born about 1846, married 1.) Adderson or Addison Woodring on 15 October 186348 and then married 2.) Isaac Fisher Morrison on 13 February 1866.49
  • Malcolm, born June 1850 (no marriage record found in Hardin County, Kentucky).
  • Colmore, born about 1852 (no marriage record found in Hardin County, Kentucky).

On 14 June 1852, Letitia Gilliland Richardson died (possibly of complications due to childbirth) and was buried at Blue Ball Baptist Cemetery in Hardin County, Kentucky.50

On 10 January 1853 Isaac E. Morrison married his second wife, twenty-six-year-old Susan Coffman, at her home in Hardin County, Kentucky.51 Together, they had at least three children:

  • Alonzo W., born about 1854, married Sara L. Wood 25 June 1878.52
  • Mary E., born about 1859, married William C. Higdon 14 February 1875.53
  • Horace, born about 1865 (no marriage record found in Hardin County, Kentucky).

During the Civil War, a man named Isaac Richardson served as a private in Co. K, First Kentucky Cavalry, commanded by Benjamin Helm (President Abraham Lincoln's brother-in-law). It is uncertain, however, whether this particular Isaac Richardson was the same person treated in this sketch (if so, it would explain why Susan Coffman Richardson had no children between 1860 and 1864). However, given "our" Isaac's age at the time the war began (54) and the large family he had to support, it seems unlikely that he enlisted.

Although Isaac's sons Greenberry (or Greenbury) and Stephen were both of military age in the 1860s, it is equally uncertain whether either one rendered any military service during the Civil War. While searching for evidence, I came across the military service record of a Greenbury Richardson who enlisted in a Confederate regiment from Kentucky and was also a prisoner-of-war, but he was over fifty years old and came from Grant County. I have also found the record of a Stephen or Steven Richardson who served in a Union cavalry unit and deserted, as well as the Union pension record of a Stephen L. Richardson (Sgt., Co. B, 9th Kentucky Cavalry) but there is no way to be certain if either of these men was Isaac Richardson's son.

On 15 October 1863 Isaac's seventeen-year-old daughter Ady (or Ada) Ann married twenty-three-year-old Adderson (or Addison) Woodring, son of Charles and Matilda Woodring.54 Less than two years later, on either 29 March or 01 October 1865, Adderson (or Addison) Woodring died, leaving Ady (or Ada) Ann a widow at the tender age of only nineteen.55 Family lore holds that she and her first husband had two children whose names were Lonnie and Latisha but only the girl can be accounted for in federal census records, where she is listed as Latisha Morrison, not Woodring.56

On February 13, 1866, Ady (or Ada) Ann married for the second time at her father's home. Her new husband was Isaac Fisher Morrison, a twenty-six-year-old Union Civil War veteran and son of Samuel Haycraft Morrison.57 Isaac was also Ady Ann's second cousin due to the fact that they had a great-grandfather, David Morrison, in common.

Sometime between 1870 and 1873, Isaac's wife Susan Coffman Richardson died.58 Her place of burial is presently unknown.

On 18 November 1873 Isaac E. Morrison married his third wife, forty-six-year-old Mary Letitia Miller, in Hardin County, Kentucky.59 There were no children by this marriage.

Sometime between 1880 and 1893, Isaac E. Richardson died and apparently left no will. Following his death his widow, Susan, went to live with her sister Martha in Elizabethtown, where she (Susan) passed away 15 April 1893.60 Although the location of Isaac's grave is presently unknown, my best guess is Blue Ball Baptist Cemetery. His last wife, Mary Miller Richardson, was buried in Section L, Lot 0031, in the Elizabethtown City Cemetery.61


Ady (or Ada) Ann Richardson (Abt. 1846-1926)

Ady (or Ada) Ann Richardson, a daughter of Isaac E. Richardson and his wife Letitia, was born about 1846 in Hardin County, Kentucky.

On 15 October 1863 seventeen-year-old Ady (or Ada) Ann married twenty-three-year-old Adderson (or Addison) Woodring, son of Charles and Matilda Woodring.62 Less than two years later, on either 29 March or 01 October 1865, Adderson (or Addison) Woodring died, leaving Ady (or Ada) Ann a widow at the tender age of only nineteen.63 Family lore holds that she and her first husband had two children whose names were Lonnie and Latisha but only the girl can be accounted for in federal census records, where she is listed as Latisha Morrison, not Woodring.64

On February 13, 1866, Ady (or Ada) Ann married for the second time at her father's home. Her new husband was Isaac Fisher Morrison,65 a twenty-six-year-old Union Civil War veteran and son of Samuel Haycraft Morrison. Isaac was also Ady Ann's second cousin due to the fact that they had a great-grandfather, David Morrison, in common.

(To learn more about Ady (or Ada) Ann Richardson, see Isaac Fisher Morrison.)


NOTES

1Some of the information contained in the sections on Jonathan Richardson and William Richardson was derived from correspondence between me and Mrs. Mae Mead of Rye, Colorado and also email and letters between her daughter, Marsha A. Lybbert, and me, during June and July 1999. See also: "Descendants of Jonathan Richardson," familytreemaker.com <http://familytreemaker.genealogy.com/users/a/l/k/Lessa-M-Alkire/GENE2-0001.html> [Accessed 17 February 2012.]

2Joida Whitten, Abstract of Bedford County, Va. Wills and Inventories and Accounts 1754-1787 (Dallas, Texas: n.p., 1968), 183-4.

3See note 1.

4Rootsweb, Lincoln County, Kentucky female marriages < http://www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~kylinco2/marriages/Females-Reynolds-Robertson.htm> [Accessed 24 February 2012.]

5Rootsweb, Lincoln County, Kentucky male marriages < http://www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~kylinco2/marriages/Males-Rhodes-Rogers.htm> [Accessed 24 February 2012.]

6Ibid.

7Hardin County, Courthouse, Elizabethtown, Kentucky, Will of William Richardson, written 20 November 1819 and proved May 1825, book and page numbers unknown, document reportedly lost or stolen sometime since 1943; handwritten transcribed abstract by Mrs. Mae Mead of Rye, Colorado.

8 Ibid.

9Lincoln County, Kentucky marriages, <http://files.usgwarchives.org/ky/lincoln/vitals/marriages/marriage_index_1781_1800_male.txt> [Accessed 17 February 2012.]

10Names and birth dates of children are based on federal census records for this family and Amos Richardson's will, and subsequent deed records on file in Hardin County that name his heirs.

11I don't recall where I got Elizabeth's date of birth but her status as the wife of Bennett Franklin is confirmed by the wills of both Amos Richardson (see note 5) and Bennett Franklin (Hardin County Courthouse, Elizabethtown, Kentucky, Will Book E, 407) and also federal census records.

12Hardin County Courthouse, Elizabethtown, Kentucky, Marriage Book A, 140.

13Hardin County Courthouse, Elizabethtown, Kentucky, Marriage Book A, 143.

14Hardin County Courthouse, Elizabethtown, Kentucky, Marriage Book A, 210.

15Hardin County Courthouse, Elizabethtown, Kentucky, Marriage Book A, 174.

16Hardin County Courthouse, Elizabethtown, Kentucky, Marriage Book C, 55.

17Hardin County Courthouse, Elizabethtown, Kentucky, Marriage Book D, 168.

18Hardin County Courthouse, Elizabethtown, Kentucky, Marriage Book A, 156.

19Hardin County Courthouse, Elizabethtown, Kentucky, Marriage Book A, 225.

20Hardin County Courthouse, Elizabethtown, Kentucky, Marriage Book A, 213.

21Hardin County Courthouse, Elizabethtown, Kentucky, Marriage Book A, 230.

22Hardin County Courthouse, Elizabethtown, Kentucky, Marriage Book B, 47.

23G. Glenn Clift, "Second Census" of Kentucky, 1800: A privately compiled and published enumeration of taxpayers appearing in the 79 manuscript volumes extant of tax lists of the 42 counties of Kentucky in existence in 1800 (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., 1966), 247.

24U. S. Dept. of Commerce, Bureau of the Census, Third Census of the United States, 1810: Population, Hardin County, Kentucky, 340-1.

25Hardin County Courthouse, Elizabethtown, Kentucky, Deed Book A, 490-2.

26Report of the Adjutant General of the State of Kentucky, Soldiers of the War of 1812 (Frankfort, Kentucky, 1891), 129 & 246.

27Hardin County Courthouse, Elizabethtown, Kentucky, Deed Book G, 473-5.

28Hardin County Courthouse, Elizabethtown, Kentucky, Marriage Book A, 80.

29Hardin County Courthouse, Elizabethtown, Kentucky, Will Book E, 39-41; Hardin County Courthouse, Elizabethtown, Kentucky, Marriage Book B, 83; Susan Richardson Lawson, Find-a-Grave Memorial <http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GScid=2417586&GRid=80438290&> [Accessed 28 February 2012.]

30U. S. Dept. of Commerce, Bureau of the Census, Fourth Census of the United States, 1820: Population, Hardin County, Kentucky, 84-5.

31Hardin County Courthouse, Elizabethtown, Kentucky, Deed Book N, 248.

32Hardin County Courthouse, Elizabethtown, Kentucky, Deed Book U, 541-3.

33Hardin County Courthouse, Elizabethtown, Kentucky, Deed Book H, 80.

34U. S. Dept. of Commerce, Bureau of the Census, Fifth Census of the United States, 1830: Population, Hardin County, Kentucky, 329.

35Hardin County Courthouse, Elizabethtown, Kentucky, Deed Book N, 99-100.

36Hardin County Courthouse, Elizabethtown, Kentucky, Will Book E, 39-41.

37U. S. Dept. of Commerce, Bureau of the Census, Sixth Census of the United States, 1840: Population, Hardin County, Kentucky, 43.

38Hardin County Courthouse, Elizabethtown, Kentucky, Will Book E, 39-41.

39Hardin County Courthouse, Elizabethtown, Kentucky, Marriage Book B, 83.

40U. S. Dept. of Commerce, Bureau of the Census, Seventh Census of the United States, 1840: Population, Hardin County, Kentucky, 427.

41Hardin County Courthouse, Elizabethtown, Kentucky, Marriage Book A, 174.

42Names and birth dates of children are primarily based on federal census records for this family.

43Hardin County Courthouse, Elizabethtown, Kentucky, Marriage Book C, 44.

44Hardin County Courthouse, Elizabethtown, Kentucky, Marriage Book C, 81.

45Hardin County Courthouse, Elizabethtown, Kentucky, Marriage Book D, 153.

46Hardin County Courthouse, Elizabethtown, Kentucky, Marriage Book D, 35.

47Hardin County Courthouse, Elizabethtown, Kentucky, Marriage Book C, 136.

48Hardin County Courthouse, Elizabethtown, Kentucky, Marriage Book D, 17.

49Hardin County Courthouse, Elizabethtown, Kentucky, Marriage Book D, 46.

50Leticia Richardson (1810-1852), Find A Grave Memorial <http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GSob=c&GSmcid=46960607&GRid=31134406&> {Accessed 25 February 2012.]

51Hardin County Courthouse, Elizabethtown, Kentucky, Marriage Book C, 55. 52Hardin County Courthouse, Elizabethtown, Kentucky, Marriage Book E, 24. 53Hardin County Courthouse, Elizabethtown, Kentucky, Marriage Book D, 188. 54Hardin County Courthouse, Elizabethtown, Kentucky, Marriage Book D, 17.

55Addison Woodring, Find A Grave Memorial < http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GSln=Woodring&GSfn=Addison&GSbyrel=all&GSdyrel=all&GSst=19&GScntry=4&GSob=n&GRid=27050763&df=all&> {Accessed 28 February 2012.] Note: The years of birth and death at this online memorial for Addison Woodring are both incorrect but it identifies his place of burial, which is why I have included it here.

56U. S. Dept. of Commerce, Bureau of the Census, Ninth Census of the United States, 1870: Population, Edmonson County, Kentucky, Dwelling 577, Family 580, written page 92.

57Hardin County Courthouse, Elizabethtown, Kentucky, Marriage Book D, 46.

58This conjecture is based on the fact that Susan is listed in the 1870 federal census but not 1880 and also the fact that her husband remarried in 1873.

59Hardin County Courthouse, Elizabethtown, Kentucky, Marriage Book D, 168.

60Hardin County Courthouse, Elizabethtown, Kentucky, Will Book G, 9-10.

61Elizabethtown Cemetery Database, Mary Richardson < http://www.ltadd.org/cgi-bin/databases/etowncemetery/db.pl?db=default&uid=&FirstName=Mary&LastName=Richardson&Section=L&Lot=0031&Grave=&keyword=&mh=10&sb=---&so=ascend&view_records=View+Records> [Accessed 28 February 2012.]

62See note 54.

63See note 55.

64U. S. Dept. of Commerce, Bureau of the Census, Ninth Census of the United States, 1870: Population, Edmonson County, Kentucky, Dwelling 577, Family 580, written page 92.

65Hardin County Courthouse, Elizabethtown, Kentucky, Marriage Book D, 46.

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